(via fuckyeah1990s)

fashionsprose:

Details at Valentino Pre-Fall 2014


#feathercollarenvy

fashionsprose:

Details at Valentino Pre-Fall 2014

#feathercollarenvy

(via tgifreitag)

"You only missed my voice
when nobody else called you."

Y.Z, A ten word story on being a second choice

(Source: rustyvoices, via virginidad)

(Source: hoodoothatvoodoo, via wonderfuck)

(Source: forgottencool, via wehadnoidea)

Me too, Jigglypuff.

Me too, Jigglypuff.

(Source: larvitarr, via fuckyeah1990s)

"One must still have chaos in oneself to be able to give birth to a dancing star."

Friedrich Nietzsche

(Source: psych-quotes, via virginidad)

(Source: sandandglass, via taaylow)

(Source: sandandglass, via youslackin)

THIS IS WHAT LOVE LOOKS LIKE

(Source: eltigrechico, via slightlypretentious)

theatlantic:

It’s Not Just Frozen, Most Disney Movies Are Pro-Gay

The culture warriors have decided: Disney’s Frozen is queer. Elsa hiding her ice-powers could be read as a metaphor for the closet, the Oscar-winning “Let it Go” plays like a coming-out anthem, and a character in the film evokes the question of whether homosexuality is a choice by inquiring of Elsa’s powers, “born with it or cursed?” Some liberals have praised the film for its subtext; some conservatives have denounced it.
But the most remarkable thing about queer readings of the film may be how unremarkable they really are. Through both its corporate practices and the content of its films, Disney for decades has implemented the so-called “gay agenda”—which is to say, helping make the world a more accepting place.

To start in the most obvious place: As a business, Disney has long held a progressive attitude toward LGBT people. Gay pride events have been hosted at Disney World since 1991, and the company started offered its gay employees health insurance benefits for their partners since 1995, a decision that wasn’t entirely popular back then.

One of the most poignant examples of the company’s tolerant atmosphere is the case of lyricist Howard Ashman, who was openly gay and died of AIDS in 1991. Not only did Ashman write songs for The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast and Aladdin, he was also closely involved in those films’ productions, casting actors and holding story meetings with animators. At the end of Beauty and the Beast, Disney acknowledged his contributions with this tribute: “To our friend Howard Ashman who gave a mermaid her voice and a beast his soul, we will be forever grateful.”
But Ashman’s story also offers an example of how the substance of Disney’s films reflect an interest in LGBT peoples’ struggles.
Read more. [Image: Disney]

theatlantic:

It’s Not Just Frozen, Most Disney Movies Are Pro-Gay

The culture warriors have decided: Disney’s Frozen is queer. Elsa hiding her ice-powers could be read as a metaphor for the closet, the Oscar-winning “Let it Go” plays like a coming-out anthem, and a character in the film evokes the question of whether homosexuality is a choice by inquiring of Elsa’s powers, “born with it or cursed?” Some liberals have praised the film for its subtext; some conservatives have denounced it.

But the most remarkable thing about queer readings of the film may be how unremarkable they really are. Through both its corporate practices and the content of its films, Disney for decades has implemented the so-called “gay agenda”—which is to say, helping make the world a more accepting place.

To start in the most obvious place: As a business, Disney has long held a progressive attitude toward LGBT people. Gay pride events have been hosted at Disney World since 1991, and the company started offered its gay employees health insurance benefits for their partners since 1995, a decision that wasn’t entirely popular back then.

One of the most poignant examples of the company’s tolerant atmosphere is the case of lyricist Howard Ashman, who was openly gay and died of AIDS in 1991. Not only did Ashman write songs for The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast and Aladdin, he was also closely involved in those films’ productions, casting actors and holding story meetings with animators. At the end of Beauty and the Beast, Disney acknowledged his contributions with this tribute: “To our friend Howard Ashman who gave a mermaid her voice and a beast his soul, we will be forever grateful.”

But Ashman’s story also offers an example of how the substance of Disney’s films reflect an interest in LGBT peoples’ struggles.

Read more. [Image: Disney]

maudelynn:

Elsa Schiaparelli Hats, c.1938 , by Erwin Blumenfeld.
via photographyandarthistoryrocks.com

maudelynn:

Elsa Schiaparelli Hats, c.1938 , by Erwin Blumenfeld.

via photographyandarthistoryrocks.com

thisisfusion:

Justice Sotomayor just schooled her fellow Supreme Court Justices with these “race matters” quotes: http://fus.in/1lFpiRE

thisisfusion:

Justice Sotomayor just schooled her fellow Supreme Court Justices with these “race matters” quotes: http://fus.in/1lFpiRE

newwavefeminism:

Had to give tumble snaps as an educator to karnythia for what I read on my TL this morning. Especially that last retweet, this literally just happened in boston public schools. Middle school students all over the district received a letter saying there will no longer be school bus service to the schools. They’re hinting at providing students with t-passes but who knows what the follow through will be… (Though I think they’re trying to force students of color to attend their underperforming neighborhood schools and keep them out of the upper-tier public schools)

(via so-treu)

ethiopienne:

Sonia Sotomayor delivers blistering dissent against affirmative action ban

The Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on affirmative action Tuesday, but not without a blistering dissent from Justice Sonia Sotomayor.
Sotomayor said the decision infringed upon groups’ rights by allowing Michigan voters to change “the basic rules of the political process … in a manner that uniquely disadvantaged racial minorities.”
"In my colleagues’ view, examining the racial impact of legislation only perpetuates racial discrimination," Sotomayor added. “This refusal to accept the stark reality that race matters is regrettable. As members of the judiciary tasked with intervening to carry out the guarantee of equal protection, we ought not sit back and wish away, rather than confront, the racial inequality that exists in our society.”
The court’s 6-2 decision upheld a voter-approved change to the Michigan state Constitution that prevents public colleges from using race as a factor in its admissions. As the AP noted, the ruling provides a boost for other education-related affirmative action bans in California and Washington state.
ABC News pointed out that Sotomayor has been open about the role affirmative action has played in her personal life. In her memoir “My Beloved World,” Sotomayor wrote that it “opened doors” for her.
"But one thing has not changed: to doubt the worth of minority students’ achievement when they succeed is really only to present another face of the prejudice that would deny them a chance even to try," she wrote.
Read Sotomayor’s full dissent here.

ethiopienne:

Sonia Sotomayor delivers blistering dissent against affirmative action ban

The Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on affirmative action Tuesday, but not without a blistering dissent from Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Sotomayor said the decision infringed upon groups’ rights by allowing Michigan voters to change “the basic rules of the political process … in a manner that uniquely disadvantaged racial minorities.”

"In my colleagues’ view, examining the racial impact of legislation only perpetuates racial discrimination," Sotomayor added. “This refusal to accept the stark reality that race matters is regrettable. As members of the judiciary tasked with intervening to carry out the guarantee of equal protection, we ought not sit back and wish away, rather than confront, the racial inequality that exists in our society.”

The court’s 6-2 decision upheld a voter-approved change to the Michigan state Constitution that prevents public colleges from using race as a factor in its admissions. As the AP noted, the ruling provides a boost for other education-related affirmative action bans in California and Washington state.

ABC News pointed out that Sotomayor has been open about the role affirmative action has played in her personal life. In her memoir “My Beloved World,” Sotomayor wrote that it “opened doors” for her.

"But one thing has not changed: to doubt the worth of minority students’ achievement when they succeed is really only to present another face of the prejudice that would deny them a chance even to try," she wrote.

Read Sotomayor’s full dissent here.

(via so-treu)